Rumi - "The Lord is in Me" and "Love Said to Me"

I was sent a couple of poems by Rumi recently, and I wish to share them here. May you find inspiration in them for a glorious weekend!

The Lord is in Me

The Lord is in me, and the Lord is in you,
As life is hidden in every seed.
So rubble your pride, my friend,
And look for Him within you.

When I sit in the heart of His world
A million suns blaze with light,
A burning blue sea spreads across the sky,
Life's turmoil falls quiet,
All the stains of suffering wash away.

Listen to the unstruck bells and drums!
Love is here; plunge into its rapture!
Rains pour down without water;
Rivers are streams of light.

How could I ever express
How blessed I feel
To revel in such vast ecstasy
In my own body?

This is the music
Of soul and soul meeting.
Of the forgetting of all grief.
This is the music
That transcends all coming and going.


Love Said to Me

I worship the moon.
Tell me of the soft glow of a
candle light
and the sweetness of my moon.

Don't talk about sorrow,
tell me of that treasure,
hidden if it is to you,
then just remain silent.

Last night
I lost my grip on reality
and welcomed insanity.
Love
saw me and said,
I showed up.
Wipe you tears
and be silent.

I said, O Love
I am frightened,
but it's not you.
Love said to me,
there is nothing that is not me.
be silent.

I will whisper secrets in your ear
just nod yes
and be silent.

A soul moon
appeared in the path of my heart.
How precious is this journey.

I said, O Love
what kind of moon is this?
Love said to me,
this is not for you to question.
be silent.

I said, O Love
what kind of face is this,
angelic, or human?
Love said to me,
this is beyond anything that you know.
Be silent.

I said, please reveal this to me
I am dying in anticipation.
Love said to me,
that is where I want you:
Always on the edge,
be silent.
You dwell in this hall of
images and illusions,
leave this house now
and be silent.

I said, O Love,
tell me this:
Does the Lord know you are
treating me this way?
Love said to me,
yes He does,
just be totally…
totally… silent

Comments

Charles upton said…
Sufi-Dari Books

(An imprint of Sophia Perennis)

Announces the Publication of

The Quatrains of Rumi

(Beginning of Marketing Campaign: May 20, 2009):



Rubâ‘iyât-é

Jalâluddîn Muhammad Balkhî-Rumî

ISBN 978-1-59731-450-3; $25.95, £19.50



Translated by

Ibrâhîm W. Gamard

and

A. G. Rawân Farhâdî



COMPLETE TRANSLATION WITH PERSIAN TEXT,

ISLAMIC MYSTICAL COMMENTARY,

MANUAL OF TERMS, AND CONCORDANCE



The first complete English translation of the Quatrains -- over 700 pages -- based on the Persian of the original, complete, and uncorrupt Forûzânfar edition –

translated with close attention to Rumi’s idiomatic usage,

with the collaboration of scholar from Afghanistan,

whose native Persian remains close to Rumi’s own



The “version-makers” of the poetry of Jalâluddîn Rumî have helped to make him perhaps today’s most popular poet in the English language.

But they have not served his intended meaning with equal zeal,

often portraying him as a “universal” mystic who had somehow “transcended” Islam, even though his celebrated Mathnavi has been called “the Qur’an in the Persian tongue.” Ibrâhîm W. Gamard

and A. G. Rawân Farhâdi have labored to set the record straight,

and to demonstrate that Mawlana’s universality is inseparable

from his Islam -- from the depth of his Islam.



For more information, contact Sufi-Dari Books/ Sophia Perennis at:

jameswetmore@mac.com

or info@sophiaperennis.com
Charles Upton said…
Sufi-Dari Books

(An imprint of Sophia Perennis)

Announces the Publication of

The Quatrains of Rumi

(Beginning of Marketing Campaign: May 20, 2009):



Rubâ‘iyât-é

Jalâluddîn Muhammad Balkhî-Rumî

ISBN 978-1-59731-450-3; $25.95, £19.50



Translated by

Ibrâhîm W. Gamard

and

A. G. Rawân Farhâdî



COMPLETE TRANSLATION WITH PERSIAN TEXT,

ISLAMIC MYSTICAL COMMENTARY,

MANUAL OF TERMS, AND CONCORDANCE



The first complete English translation of the Quatrains -- over 700 pages -- based on the Persian of the original, complete, and uncorrupt Forûzânfar edition –

translated with close attention to Rumi’s idiomatic usage,

with the collaboration of scholar from Afghanistan,

whose native Persian remains close to Rumi’s own



The “version-makers” of the poetry of Jalâluddîn Rumî have helped to make him perhaps today’s most popular poet in the English language.

But they have not served his intended meaning with equal zeal,

often portraying him as a “universal” mystic who had somehow “transcended” Islam, even though his celebrated Mathnavi has been called “the Qur’an in the Persian tongue.” Ibrâhîm W. Gamard

and A. G. Rawân Farhâdi have labored to set the record straight,

and to demonstrate that Mawlana’s universality is inseparable

from his Islam -- from the depth of his Islam.



For more information, contact Sufi-Dari Books/ Sophia Perennis at:

jameswetmore@mac.com

or info@sophiaperennis.com

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